Digital Theory & Aesthetics – Week 06

Part of Robert Morris' Bodyspacemotionthings (1971) at the Tate Modern, London. Image: guardian.co.uk

As I’ve often a tendency to do, I tried to be overly clever with my (very) short essay on interaction this week. Basing my paper on Robert Morris’ Plywood Show (1964), I had to express in just 300 words why I thought his work was interactive – and if it wasn’t, make it so.

The image above clearly shows that Morris’ work is often interactive, even if it’s not based in the digital interaction that we’ve come to know today – and focus on in our course. My attitude hasn’t changed since studying this subject, as I argued in my paper.

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